Willis G. Hale's "City of Beautiful Buildings"

Photos and descriptions of architect willis gaylord hale's buildings

"The Lorraine"Philadelphia, PA1892-1893
Designed in 1892 by Willis G. Hale as an apartment house, “The Lorraine” would later go on to become the “Divine Lorraine" after it was purchased in by Father Divine in 1948. After being purchase by Father Divine it would become one of the first hotels of its caliber to be racially integrated.
From the Historic American Buildings Survey:

The Divine Lorraine Hotel stands among the most visible buildings constructed during the decades that North Broad Street above Spring Garden Avenue challenged—to varying degrees of success—the old elite enclaves and institutions of Center City for designation as the most fashionable residential and civic district of Philadelphia. Constructed as an apartment house, the Lorraine stands among the earliest “full blown” examples of this type in a city known for its tradition of single family houses. The structure reigns among the important extant works of architect Willis G. Hale whose eccentric and unique high Victorian designs made him the darling of the fashion-conscious arrivistes pouring into Northwest Philadelphia late in the nineteenth century and early in the twentieth century.

"The Lorraine"
Philadelphia, PA
1892-1893

Designed in 1892 by Willis G. Hale as an apartment house, “The Lorraine” would later go on to become the “Divine Lorraine" after it was purchased in by Father Divine in 1948. After being purchase by Father Divine it would become one of the first hotels of its caliber to be racially integrated.

From the Historic American Buildings Survey:

The Divine Lorraine Hotel stands among the most visible buildings constructed during the decades that North Broad Street above Spring Garden Avenue challenged—to varying degrees of success—the old elite enclaves and institutions of Center City for designation as the most fashionable residential and civic district of Philadelphia. Constructed as an apartment house, the Lorraine stands among the earliest “full blown” examples of this type in a city known for its tradition of single family houses. The structure reigns among the important extant works of architect Willis G. Hale whose eccentric and unique high Victorian designs made him the darling of the fashion-conscious arrivistes pouring into Northwest Philadelphia late in the nineteenth century and early in the twentieth century.

  • 13 September 2012
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